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Poems Every Child Should Know by  Mary E. Burt

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Poems Every Child Should Know
by Mary E. Burt
An outstanding collection of poems that appeal to both boys and girls, compiled by a teacher who believed in the formative power of learning poetry by heart. 'Children,' she maintains, 'should build for their future and get, while they are children, what only the fresh imagination of the child can assimilate. They should store up an untold wealth of heroic sentiment; they should acquire the habit of carrying a literary quality in their conversation; they should carry a heart full of the fresh and delightful associations and memories connected with poetry hours to brighten mature years. They should develop their memories while they have memories to develop.' The poems are grouped into six sections (The Budding Moment, The Little Child, The Day's at the Morn, Lad and Lassie, On and On, 'Grow Old Along with Me') to make it easier to locate poems that match a child's maturity.  Ages 8-12
391 pages $14.95   







[39] "Jack Frost," by Hannah Flagg Gould (1789-1865), is perhaps a hundred years old, but he is the same rollicking fellow to-day as of yore. The poem puts his merry pranks to the front and prepares the way for science to give him a true analysis.

The Frost looked forth, one still, clear night,

And whispered, "Now I shall be out of sight;

So through the valley and over the height,

In silence I'll take my way:

I will not go on with that blustering train,

The wind and the snow, the hail and the rain,

Who make so much bustle and noise in vain,

But I'll be as busy as they."

Then he flew to the mountain and powdered its crest;

He lit on the trees, and their boughs he dressed

In diamond beads—and over the breast

Of the quivering lake he spread

A coat of mail, that it need not fear

The downward point of many a spear

That hung on its margin far and near,

Where a rock could rear its head.

He went to the windows of those who slept,

And over each pane, like a fairy, crept;

Wherever he breathed, wherever he slept,

By the light of the moon were seen


Most beautiful things—there were flowers and trees;

There were bevies of birds and swarms of bees;

There were cities with temples and towers, and these

All pictured in silver sheen!

But he did one thing that was hardly fair;

He peeped in the cupboard, and finding there

That all had forgotten for him to prepare—

"Now just to set them a-thinking,

I'll bite this basket of fruit," said he,

"This costly pitcher I'll burst in three,

And the glass of water they've left for me

Shall 'tchich!' to tell them I'm drinking."


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 Table of Contents  |  Index  | Previous: The Nightingale and the Glow-Worm  |  Next: The Owl
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