Home  |  Authors  |  Books  |  Stories  |  What's New  |  How to Get Involved 
   T h e   B a l d w i n   P r o j e c t
     Bringing Yesterday's Classics to Today's Children                 @mainlesson.com
Search This Site Only
 
 
Poems Every Child Should Know by  Mary E. Burt


 

 

INGRATITUDE

"Ingratitude," by William Shakespeare (1564-1616), is an incisive thrust at a refined vice. It is a part of education to learn to be grateful.

Blow, blow, thou winter wind,

Thou are not so unkind

As man's ingratitude;

Thy tooth is not so keen

Because thou are not seen,

Although thy breath be rude.


Freeze, freeze, thou bitter sky,

Thou dost not bite so nigh

As benefits forgot;

Though thou the waters warp,

Thy sting is not so sharp

As friend remembered not.


WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE.


 Table of Contents  |  Index  | Previous: O Captain! My Captain!  |  Next: The Ivy Green
Copyright (c) 2000-2017 Yesterday's Classics, LLC. All Rights Reserved.