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The Oak-Tree Fairy Book by  Clifton Johnson
Table of Contents


 

 

THE TWIST-MOUTH FAMILY

[9]

T
HERE was once a father and a mother and several children, and all but one of them had their mouths twisted out of shape. The one whose mouth was not twisted was a son names John.

When John got to be a young man he was sent to college, and on the day he came home for his first vacation the family sat up late in the evening to hear him tell of all he had learned. But finally they prepared to go to bed, and the mother said, "Father, will you blow out the light?"

"Yes, I will," was his reply.

"Well, I wish you would," said she.

"Well, I will," he said.

So he blew, but his mouth was twisted and he blew upward, this way—and he couldn't blow out the light.


[Illustration]

Then he said, "Mother, will you blow out the light?"

[10] "Yes, I will," was her reply.

"Well, I wish you would," said he.

"Well, I will," she said.

So she blew, but her mouth was twisted and she blew downward, this way—and she couldn't blow out the light.


[Illustration]

The she spoke to he daughter and said, "Mary, will you blow out the light?"

"Yes, I will," was Mary's reply.

"Well, I wish you would," said her mother.

"Well, I will," Mary said.

So Mary blew, but her mouth was twisted and she blew out of the right corner of her mouth, this way—and she couldn't blow out the light.


[Illustration]

Then Mary spoke to one of her brothers and said, "Dick, will you blow out the light?"

"Yes, I will," was Dick's reply.

"Well, I wish you would," said Mary.

"Well, I will," Dick said.

So Dick blew, but his mouth was twisted, and he blew out of the left corner of his mouth, this [11] way—and he couldn't blow out the light.


[Illustration]

Then Dick said, "John, will you blow out the light?"

"Yes, I will," was John's reply.

"Well, I wish you would," said Dick.

"Well, I will," John said.

So John blew, and his mouth was not twisted and he blew straight, this way—and he blew out the light.


[Illustration]

The light was out, and they were all glad that John had succeeded, and the father said, "What a blessed thing it is to have larnin'!"


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