Home  |  Authors  |  Books  |  Stories  |  What's New  |  How to Get Involved 
   T h e   B a l d w i n   P r o j e c t
     Bringing Yesterday's Classics to Today's Children                 @mainlesson.com
Search This Site Only
 
 
The Oak-Tree Fairy Book by  Clifton Johnson
Table of Contents

[Illustration] Hundreds of additional titles available for online reading when you join Gateway to the Classics

Learn More
[Illustration]

 

 

THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG

[59]

O
NCE an old woman was sweeping her house and she found a piece of money, and she took the money to market and bought a pig. Then she told the pig to run home, and the pig said, "I won't!"

So the ole woman looked around and she saw a dog, and she said, "Dog, dog, bite the pig and make piggy run home. I see by the moonlight 'tis half-past midnight—time pig and I were at home an hour ago."

But the dog said, "No, pig doesn't do me any harm;" and he wouldn't.

So the old woman looked around and she saw a stick, and she said, "Stick, stick, bang dog, dog won't bite pig, and piggy won't run home. I see by the moonlight 'tis half-past midnight—time pig and I were at home an hour ago."

But the stick said, "No, dog doesn't do me any harm;" and it wouldn't.

[60] So the old woman looked around and she saw a fire, and she said, "Fire, fire, burn stick, stick won't bang dog, dog won't bite pig, and piggy won't run home. I see by the moonlight 'tis half-past midnight—time pig and I were at home an hour ago."

But the fire said, "No, stick doesn't do me any harm;" and it wouldn't.

So the old woman looked around and she saw a puddle of water, and she said, "Water, water, quench fire, stick won't bang dog, dog won't bite pig, and piggy won't run home. I see by the moonlight 'tis half-past midnight—time pig and I were at home an hour ago."

But the water said, "No, fire doesn't do my any harm;" and it wouldn't.

So the old woman looked around and she saw an ox, and she said, "ox, ox, drink water, water won't quench fire, stick won't bang dog, dog won't bite pig, and piggy won't run home. I see by the moonlight 'tis half-past midnight—time pig and I were at home an hour ago."

But the ox said. "No, water doesn't do me any harm;" and it wouldn't.

[61] So the old woman looked around and she saw a butcher, and she said, "Butcher, butcher, kill ox, ox won't drink water, water won't quench fire, stick won't bang dog, dog won't bite pig, and piggy won't run home. I see by the moonlight 'tis half-past midnight—time pig and I were at home an hour ago."


[Illustration]

But the butcher said, "no, ox doesn't do me any harm;" and he wouldn't.

So the old woman looked around and she saw a rope, and she said, "Rope, rope, hang butcher, butcher won't kill ox, ox won't drink water, water won't quench fire, stick won't bang dog, dog won't bite pig, and piggy won't run home. [62] I see by the moonlight 'tis half-past midnight—time pig and I were at home an hour ago."

But the rope said, "No, butcher doesn't do me any harm;" and it wouldn't.

So the old woman looked around and she saw a rat, and she said, "Rat, rat, gnaw rope, rope won't hang butcher, butcher won't kill ox, ox won't drink water, water won't quench fire, stick won't bang dog, dog won't bite pig, and piggy won't run home. I see by the moonlight 'tis half-past midnight—time pig and I were at home an hour ago."

But the rat said, "No, rope doesn't do my any harm:" and it wouldn't.

Then the ole woman said to the rat, "I'll cut your tail off, then."

The rat did not want to lose its tail and it began to gnaw the rope, and the rope began to hang the butcher, and the butcher began to kill to ox, and the ox began to drink the water, and the water began to quench the fire, and the fire began to burn the stick, and the ctick began to bang the god, and the dog began to bite the pig, and piggy ran home can criek,

"QUEEK! QUEEK!"


 Table of Contents  |  Index  | Previous: The Two Brothers and the Old Witch  |  Next: Lady Featherflight
Copyright (c) 2000-2017 Yesterday's Classics, LLC. All Rights Reserved.