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Richard of Jamestown by  James Otis

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THE VESSELS OF THE FLEET

THESE were three in number, as I have already said: the Susan Constant, a ship of near to one hundred tons in size; the Goodspeed, of forty tons, and the Discovery, which was a pinnace of only twenty tons.


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The "Susan Constant"

And now, lest some [20] who read what I have set down may not be acquainted with the words used by seamen, let me explain that the measurement of a vessel by tons, means that she will fill so much space in the water. Now, in measuring a vessel, a ton is reckoned as forty cubic feet of space, therefore when I say the Susan Constant was one hundred tons in size, it is the same as if I had set down that she would carry four thousand cubic feet of cargo.


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The "Goodspeed"

That he who reads may know what I mean by a pinnace, as differing from a ship, I can best make it plain by saying that such a craft is an open boat, wherein may be used sails or oars, and, as in the case of the Discovery, may have a deck over a certain portion of her length. That our pinnace was a vessel able to [21] withstand such waves as would be met with in the ocean, can be believed when you remember that she was one half the size of the Goodspeed, which we counted a ship.


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The "Discovery"


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