Home  |  Authors  |  Books  |  Stories 
   T h e   B a l d w i n   P r o j e c t
     Bringing Yesterday's Classics to Today's Children                 @mainlesson.com
Search This Site Only
Indian Fables by  Ramaswami Raju
Table of Contents

Look inside ...
[Purchase Paperback Book]
Indian Fables
by P. V. Ramaswami Raju
An appealing collection of more than a hundred Indian fables that are delightful as well as short, pithy, and ingenious. Each fable has its separate moral in prose or rhyme; these are often epigrams of the shrewdest kind, full of wit and subtlety. Most of these fables are likely to be new to the majority of readers. In the characters of animals the same rules are observed as in Western fables. As the symbol of strength, the lion (or, in one or two instances, the tiger) is king, the fox is the symbol of cunning, the bear of inert power, the wolf of ferocity, the owl of assumed wisdom, and so forth.  Ages 7-10
160 pages $9.95   




A DESPOT in the East wished to have a great name as a very munificent prince, so he gave large presents to everyone of note that came to his court, but at the same time his officers had secret orders to waylay the recipients of his gifts and recover them.

In this manner many a man had been rewarded and plundered. Once a wag came to court, and amused him by his drolleries. The king gave him a great many presents, including a horse. After taking leave of the king and his courtiers, the wag bundled up the presents and put them over his shoulders, and mounting the horse, facing the tail, was going out. The king asked him why he acted in that manner.

[116] "Sire," said the wag, "simply to see if your officers were coming behind, that I may at once hand over the bundle to them and go about my business."

The despot was abashed, and stopped giving any more presents, saying, "Giving is but giving in vain, when we give to take again''

[Illustration] Hundreds of additional titles available for online reading when you join Gateway to the Classics

Learn More

 Table of Contents  |  Index  | Previous: The Lion, the Fox, and the Story-teller  |  Next: The Lion and the Elephant
Copyright (c) 2000-2018 Yesterday's Classics, LLC. All Rights Reserved.