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Aesop's Fables by  J. H. Stickney


 

 

THE DONKEY AND THE LAP DOG

[111]

T
HERE was once a man who had a Donkey and a little pet Dog. The Donkey worked all day in the fields and slept in the barn at night.

But the Lap Dog frisked about and played, jumping in his masterís lap whenever he pleased, feeding from his hand, and sleeping by his bed at night.

The Donkey grumbled a great deal at this. "How hard I work!" said he, "and I never get any pay but blows and hard words. Why should I not be petted like that wretched little Dog? It may be partly my own fault. Perhaps if I played with my master as he does, I too might be treated like him."

So the Donkey pushed his way into the house, and jumped up on his [112] masterís knee, putting his forefeet on his shoulders and giving a loud bray.

The master, almost deafened by the noise and in danger from the great clumsy creature called out, "Help! help!" and the servants, running in, drove the Donkey out of doors with sticks and stones.


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