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READING-LITERATURE: First Reader by  Harriette Taylor Treadwell and Margaret Free

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READING-LITERATURE: First Reader
by Harriette Taylor Treadwell
Second volume in the series of Reading-Literature readers, whose purpose is to train children in reading and appreciating literature through the reading of literature. Contains thirteen of the best folk tales, of gradually increasing difficulty, and 33 of the best rhymes and jingles suitable for young children. Includes The Three Little Pigs, The Cat and the Mouse, The Bremen Band, The Straw Ox, The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse, Little Two Eyes, Little Half Chick, The Fisherman and His Wife, The Sheep and the Pig and others. Attractive black and white illustrations are appealing to children.  Ages 6-8
126 pages $8.95   

 

 
[Illustration]

The Bremen Band

Donkey:

I am getting old,
I can not work.
My master wants to kill me.
What shall I do?
I will run away.
But how can I make a living?
I have a good voice.
I shall go to Bremen.
Then I can sing in the band.

[Illustration]

Donkey:

Good morning, Old Whiskers.
Why are you so sad to-day?

Cat:

How can I be happy?
I am getting old,
I can not catch mice.
My master wants to kill me.
What shall I do?

Donkey:

Come with me to Bremen.
You have a good voice.
You can sing in the band.

Cat:

Yes, I will go with you.

[Illustration]

Donkey:

Good morning, old dog.
What are you doing here?
Why do you pant so?

Dog:

I am getting old,
I can not work.

My master is going to kill me,

so I have run away.

But how can I make my living?

Donkey:

Come with us to Bremen.
We can all sing in the band.

Dog:

Yes, I will go with you.

[Illustration]

Donkey:

Good morning, Red Cock.
Why do you crow so loud?

Cock:

Cock-a-doodle-do! cock-a-doodle-do!

Company is coming to-night,

I heard the cook say.

They want me for supper,

so I crow while I can.

Donkey:

Will you come with us to Bremen?
You have a good voice.
You can sing in our band.

Cock:

Yes, I will go with you.

[Illustration]

Donkey:

It is a long way to Bremen.
Let us sleep in the woods to-night.
I shall sleep under the tree.

Dog:

I shall sleep under the tree, too.

Cat:

I shall sleep on the branches.

Cock:

I shall sleep on the branches, too.
Oh! I see a light in a house.

Donkey:

Let us go to the house.

Dog:

Yes, let us go to the house.

Donkey:

I can see in the window.

Cock:

What do you see, gray horse?

Donkey:

What do I see?
I see a table, full of good food.
There are robbers at the table.

Dog:

That shall be our supper.

Cat:

Yes, that shall be our supper.
How can we get it?

Cock:

We must drive the robbers away.
How can we do it?

Donkey:

We can all sing,

and the robbers will run away.

I can sing,
Hee-haw! hee-haw! hee-haw!

Dog:

I can sing,
Bow-wow! bow-wow! bow-wow!

Cat:

I can sing,
Mee-ow! mee-ow! mee-ow!

Cock:

I can sing, Cock-a-doo-dle-do!

cock-a-doo-dle-do!

Donkey:

I will stand by the window.
Old dog, stand on my back.
Old Whiskers, get on the dog's back.
Red Cock, get on the cat's back.

[Illustration]

Donkey:

Now, let us all sing together.
Ready, one, two, three.

All:

Hee-haw! hee-haw! hee-haw!
Bow-wow! bow-wow! bow-wow!
Mee-ow! mee-ow! mee-ow!
Cock-a-doo-dle-do! cock-a-doo-dle-do!

Robber:

Did you hear that noise?
It must be goblins.
Let us run away.

Cock:

See the robbers run.
Come, let us eat their supper.

Dog:

This is better than a bone.

Cock:

We shall never be hungry again.

Donkey:

I can eat no more.
Let us go to sleep.
I shall sleep under the tree.
Old dog, you sleep by the door.
Old Whiskers, you sleep by the fire.
Red Cock, you sleep on the roof.

Robber:

It is all still now.

The goblins are gone.
Let us go back.

Cat:

Spit, spit! I will scratch!

Robber:

Let me out, let me out!
An old goblin is scratching me.

Dog:

Bow-wow! I will bite!

Robber:

A man has cut me with a knife.
Let me out! O, let me out!

Donkey:

Hee-haw! I will kick!

Robber:

A big goblin has struck me.

Cock:

Cock-a-doo-dle-do! cock-a-doo-dle-do!

Robber:

The judge on the roof says,

"Bring the robbers here."

Come, let us be off.

Donkey:

We will not go to Bremen.
We will all live in this house.

Cock:

Cock-a-doo-dle-do! cock-a-doo-dle-do!


-German Folk Tale





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